35mm film cameras !!!

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My daughter is starting high school next year and the school had her make a list of classes she would like to take.

For an elective she chose a photography class. I thought this was pretty cool. So anyway, at my favorite thrift store they had a couple film cameras. One was a Canon and the other Nikon.

The Nikon came with two lenses and a bag and manual and a gob of filters. Pretty much everything you would need.

It's the N70 model. Pretty decent shape. It was $32. But it needs batteries, they were $12 (cr123a) And film is about $10 a roll now. Black and white is, but color is more expensive, at around $15 per roll or more.

And then it has to get processed somewhere. Probably another $10 per roll.

Unbelievable! I know she doesn't need this camera for this class. I seriously doubt they will get into film at all.

BUT! It isn't just phone cameras. The school has a different class for that called "pocket photography." Also pretty cool.

I took a bunch of photography classes in college and they had a dark room set up which you could use as much as you wanted.

I'm just shocked at the prices of film these days.
 

wheelgun1958

Buckeye
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$1.80 in 1975 is worth $10.10 today.


Jan1975Film.jpg


 
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Still using my Nikon FA. :) The worst part is waiting to see what you photographed. If you screwed up, you usually don't get a second chance. There is a local camera shop (been here for more than 50 years) that still develops film, and will push and such if asked. Yes, it costs more than it used to, but what doesn't?
 

dweis

Blackhawk
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I used Nikon equipment for my entire 30 my 35 year career as a pro. They make good gear. I remember the N70 as an amateur level camera meaning it was not a workhorse like pro models. It wen't on the market in 1994 — 29 years ago. I would place no faith in its durability over years to come. The cost of film and processing will continue to increase as the digital continues to make film obsolete because the amount of film to be processed will continue to decrease and that will force the cost of processing up. So don't count on the prices you cite being firm.

If she is really serious about photography, a digital camera would be a better choice. Digital dominates photography today. Knowledge of B&W or Color film technology will not make her better at digital photography. So if she is likely to sustain an interest staying up,to date of digital photo advances should start now.

I was in the photography club in HS. That led me to be a combat photographer in the Marines, and also a professional photographer for for 40 years. So, if she gets hooked like I did, her future in photography will be digital.
 
Joined
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Took a zillion pictures while in high school and even in college with various 35mm cameras... still remember fellow students in high school always saying, "you don't have any film in that camera!" now they would be right. I even built and worked in a dark room in college.
 
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Middle Georgia
Film photography is where I started out back in the '70s. You get to learn the basics of exposure and dof and light. Todays cameras and smart phones are probably more creative and do all the work for you. I started with the Canon FD mount AE-1 and A-1 system and moved up to the EOS film cameras. Now I'm into the 5D mkii and Fujifilm X-T1.
Taking this course, your daughter is opening a whole level of learning that will follow her later in life.
C0A2E73A-7294-4C4C-9A75-3C893912150E.jpeg
 
Joined
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If she is really serious about photography, a digital camera would be a better choice. Digital dominates photography today. Knowledge of B&W or Color film technology will not make her better at digital photography. So if she is likely to sustain an interest staying up,to date of digital photo advances should start now.
This actually makes a lot of sense. I guess I'm still old school at heart and have a collection of old film cameras. My dad had a photography business on the side and he used Nikon. It's been a few years, but he had an older Nikon F4 that he was trying to give away to anyone interested. Some of those cameras are just very heavy! I never enjoyed carrying them.

I do have several digital cameras for my daughter to use. The mirrorless cameras are nice and light weight. :)
 
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Taking this course, your daughter is opening a whole level of learning that will follow her later in life.
I'm certainly hoping so.

Nice picture by the way, Uncle Grinch.

I've used Adobe Photoshop for, I guess 30 years now (and still learning new stuff.) I try and teach her how to do different things, she's gotten pretty good at it.
 

redhawker

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I took photography classes in High School. We mostly used black and white film and processed it ourselves in the photo class lab. While film still has its place digital is the way to go nowadays. The greatest advantage of digital over film is volume. Meaning that I can take hundreds of images to the limit of my camera's SD card vs 32 shots on a roll of film. Also, you can enhance and correct digital photos. Even though it was during the film era that I was taught the following, it still applies today. The difference between a good photographer and a great photographer is that the great photographer only lets you see his best shots. With digital you have many more chances of getting that "best" shot. I find this especially true when photographing sunrises and sunsets as the entire scene changes from second to second and you would likely miss the best shots if you were limited to 32 images.
 

RSIno1

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an older Nikon F4 that he was trying to give away to anyone interested.
I was fortunate to sell my F4 just when Nikon was going to the lighter bodies and lenses. I had a 1.2 50mm and a 135 so it was an easy sale. If I remember I got $200. I stuck with Nikon at the time because our photographers were next to my shop and I could always borrow lenses up to 1200 when I was going to the races. I do wish I had kept my Mamya 645 and the 6 lenses I had for it - but the romance of medium format goes away quickly when you're lugging it around. I also got hassled by the rangers in Yosemite. They accused me of doing a commercial shoot without a permit.
 
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RSIno1:
Yeah, I was thinking about your post earlier. My dad had a Pentax medium format camera system. I think he paid a small fortune for it. This would have been in the early 80's when I was in high school.

He wouldn't let me use it very much, but did have another medium format camera I did use a lot. It was a smaller range finder type camera. Those were a lot of fun.

I bet you did get hassled by the rangers! All that gear piles up pretty quickly and would look like a commercial venture in a hurry.

That's the thing even today. Especially these days. If you have a full size DSLR, people think you are a professional and security takes notice. You really stick out. Even more so in foreign countries. Then you are the "rich American." Not a nice label.

When we go to BG and Europe I always try to go small. Just a regular point and shoot, like a Panasonic. They make great cameras. I can get good pictures and not be noticed.

For example the monasteries in Bulgaria won't allow photos. But a small camera goes unnoticed.

It would be awesome to see some of your photos if you would post some.
 
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Here, I'll brag a little about my dad. He's 91 year old. (Navy too back in the day. He gave his pea coat to my daughter.)

He was a college professor of Geology. And his side business was a photography company. He sold Geologic pictures of rocks and rock formations. Some magazines and text books, but mostly as slide sets to high schools.

Back in the late 70's and up until about 1990. He sold various slide sets illustrating geological concepts to every university in America and just about every High School.

So if anyone was in high school from say 1977 to 1993 more than likely you sat in a science class and studied my dads pictures.

My first job was helping him send out advertising, then package up these sets and ship them out.
 
Joined
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My first job out of the USAF in 1961 was at a Photo Lab developing 35, 8, and 16 MM Kodachrome. It takes about 1000' of film or leader to go thru the film developer and dryer that is why Kodachrome can not be developed at home but Kodacolor and Ektachrome can be.
If I remember correctly it took 3 different tanks of chemicals and 3 washes. All of the rolls were stapled together and put on a reel. One reel for 35mm and one reel for the 8 & 16MM. The 8MM was split after developing and dried. If you had a break you had to find which tank it was in and reach in to be able to get the leader stapled to both ends of the film in a hurry since it could only stay in the chemicals for so long. Then go wash yourself off.

Getting that low paid job of $1.25 Hr. was without a doubt the best thing that ever happened to me. :) :)
Why you might ask??? That is where I met my wife of 60 years.
She did the developing of Kodacolor than later did the payroll.
 
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She really needs a good digital camera.... for todays photography and probably one of the new mirrorless ones.... that take multiple lens... I'd still get the 35mm as a novelty and she might like messing with it.
 
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