.35 Remington

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BuckRimfire

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
Messages
15
I occasionally get a hankering for a .35 Remington. I don't currently own a "real" rifle, only a 10/22, a Marlin 60 and a Rossi 92 in .357 Magnum. Many decades ago, I harvested a few pronghorns in Wyoming with a .243, which is my only experience with bottlenecked rifles other than a few range shares of things like .30-06 and 7.35 Carcarno. (I don't say "hunted" because back then, there were so many pronghorn on the ranch my dad's buddy took us to that you went out an hour before dawn, and 90 minutes later, you had a dead animal. It was a harvest, not a hunt!)

That left me with a liking for flat-shooters, but I also like not buying components. Among other things, the .35 Remington is appealing because plinking ammo could be made with .357 bullets I already have (maybe even hunting ammo: I have a couple of boxes of 180 grain XTPs). Since I live in Seattle, if I was to go hunting (unlikely, but we can dream) on the West side there are some places where the short trajectory of the .35 might make sense, although there are also Mulies in the Okanogon for which it would not be ideal.

I saw a Remington 141 that looked nice on Gunbroker recently, which sold for about $800. I was tempted to bid on it but held back. Then a couple of days later, I was looking at Remiington 8 and 81s and realized that they are breakdown rifles. That's kinda tempting, to be able to fit it inside a backpack and be discrete when transporting it. OTOH, they seem pretty heavy, and it sounds like expected accuracy is "minute of softball" at 100 yards. And, of course, a Marlin 336 would be the "reasonable" choice, and the most abundant, I guess.

Frankly, I'd probably put a red dot sight on it or maybe a low-power scope, spoiling the "vintage" flavor of these rifles, 'cause I'm getting old and squinty.

So, try to talk me in or out of these rifles and this caliber!

If I wanted to be sensible, an inexpensive bolt gun like a Ruger American in 6.5 CM, 7-08, or .270 Win would be the obvious choice, but...

Sorry this has little relevance to Ruger but now that they own Marlin, maybe a 336 in .35 Remmy will be back some day.
 

eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,226
I already had 30/30 and .357 lever guns.

I wanted an M1A and finally bought one. So if I needed a high power hunting rifle it would be in .308 too. Just for simplicity.

I’d be torn between a Henry Long Ranger lever gun, or a bolt action.

.308 is a great round, almost 30-06 performance but more compact allowing for short action rifles.

.35 Remington is an interesting round if that’s what you want you should scratch the itch. A 30/30 would be easier to find factory ammo for.
 
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Joined
Jan 10, 2005
Messages
2,202
Location
Alexandria, LA USA
I have a 35 in the Marlin, and it is a fun gun to shoot and operate, but a little heavy to carry around very far. I admit I was looking for a 30-30 when I found this one. Sounds like the Marlin would be the right one for your purpose. A little hard to find ammo for and they are proud of it if you do. Reloading would be the way to go and I had the same idea as you, reloading using components / bullets I already have for the 357/38. Just haven't had the time, so many other things get in the way.
 
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Mauser9

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 20, 2022
Messages
336
Location
Ma.
Sounded like a great black bear round. How about ammo? Still loaded but often tougher to find lately. I would check out a marlin 336 in that round. Built like a tank.
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2005
Messages
2,202
Location
Alexandria, LA USA
One like this?
2585E067-B552-482E-8D01-71F73E99CE93.jpeg
 

jkingrph

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 31, 2006
Messages
30
Location
Jacksonville, Tx, USA
I have my father's old 336 SC (sporting carbine) in .35 Rem. I cannot remember the specs but I think it has a 20" barrel and a short magazine. Overall it is short, and handy to carry. I used to load 158 semi wadcutter bullets that I cast, for him to shoot. Very mild recoil, and very accurate, at least at relatively short range. He never liked the 150 gr pointed Reminton bullets, saying that they were not accurate, but the old standby 200 gr Core loct bullets were very good. Never killed anything with it and he shot it a fair amount in his later years with my cast loads. I'm 77 now and thinking the gun is 71-72 years old now and well taken care of still looks almost new.
 

Dave Schwaab

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 2, 2014
Messages
51
When I was younger, I had a Contender Super 14 in .35 Remington. I got a Marlin 336 as a companion piece, but I'm not really a fan of long guns, so I only shot that once. The Contender, on the other hand was a favorite. With the original open sights, I could hit 8" plates at 125 yards. The first time I shot it, I did so one-handed offhand, just so I wouldn't have any reservations about recoil and flinching. After that, I was able to get dialed in very quickly. Wanted to use that gun for hunting, but never had the chance. Wish I still had it.
 

kmoore

Buckeye
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
1,246
Location
Idaho
You're asking so here's my points. As a rifle round that's not a flat shooting cartridge by any means. It's listed as a short range deer/black bear round for a few reasons. I had a friend who owned one for many years, a Remington pump action. I shot it, hated it. For me it kicked too damn hard, wouldn't shoot a tiny group and was expansive when buying ammo, when you could find it. He carried it in open country Elk hunting and never shot a Elk. He was not much of a rifle shooter, he had me sight it in for him. He did not like the recoil, it was his fathers so he used it.
Those Remington rifles you list are old classic rifles, that does not make them bad, just hard to find and expensive. Many will be just wore out. The newer Remington 740 or 760 would be better. Not sure if they made any in .35 Remington. That's another point. It's not a popular round, never really was. Does that make it a bad round, no just harder to find ammo and rifles made for it.
If it where me and I wanted to buy that cartridge, I don't but your asking. As others mentioned the Marlin in 336 model would be my choice. You can mount a optical or peep sight even a small scope on it. You can mount a big full size scope on it, but that's silly. You will find those rifles easier, might not be cheaper. As for buying it to shoot pistol bullets, nothing wrong with that idea. Sounds like you don't burn up lots of rounds now. Would buying a caliber just to use smaller cheaper bullets for practice really be a game changer in your budget. You still need to buy a die set, cases, primers and powder for it. Along with rifle bullets to hunt deer. Handloading ammo, just about any round will have cheaper pinking bullets available. Go even cheaper and cast your own lead bullets. Forget cast bullets in a semi auto rifle.
You mention semi auto, pump and lever action rifles, plus a flat shooting rifle round. As mentioned the Henry long range is a lever, available in flat shooting rounds and can use nice pointy bullets. They are made from the drawing board to fit a scope on. That has a lot to do with how the butt stocks are made. Those older lever rifles have a low cheek weld for iron sights, not a higher mounted scope.
I have many rifles now and had many more. Sometimes the rifle or cartridge just did not met my expectations or needs. Those ended up back where l found them at a gun shop. If a gun does not work out for you try again.
Life is short, if that is the round you want, buy something in that caliber and try it out. What I like and you like are two different things, so what. Go for it.
 
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BuckRimfire

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
Messages
15
One caveat.... those 180 XTP bullets are designed for revolver velocities.... outof a .35 Remington, they will probably disintegrate on impact.
I wouldn't push them very hard. Starting loads, at most.

Not for use on elk, of course, but the blacktail deer on the West side of the Cascades, at least that I've ever seen, are ratty little things. I'm sure there are better bullets (a WFN, or a rifle-specific hollowpoint in a moderately hard alloy) but I'd bet the XTP could kill them pretty dead. Bullet might lose a fair amount of weight in the process, though.

I'm always a little skeptical about how much those would expand from my revolver loads, but I haven't had a chance to test it.
 

JiminMaine

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 2, 2012
Messages
85
Location
Western Maine
I occasionally get a hankering for a .35 Remington. I don't currently own a "real" rifle, only a 10/22, a Marlin 60 and a Rossi 92 in .357 Magnum. Many decades ago, I harvested a few pronghorns in Wyoming with a .243, which is my only experience with bottlenecked rifles other than a few range shares of things like .30-06 and 7.35 Carcarno. (I don't say "hunted" because back then, there were so many pronghorn on the ranch my dad's buddy took us to that you went out an hour before dawn, and 90 minutes later, you had a dead animal. It was a harvest, not a hunt!)

That left me with a liking for flat-shooters, but I also like not buying components. Among other things, the .35 Remington is appealing because plinking ammo could be made with .357 bullets I already have (maybe even hunting ammo: I have a couple of boxes of 180 grain XTPs). Since I live in Seattle, if I was to go hunting (unlikely, but we can dream) on the West side there are some places where the short trajectory of the .35 might make sense, although there are also Mulies in the Okanogon for which it would not be ideal.

I saw a Remington 141 that looked nice on Gunbroker recently, which sold for about $800. I was tempted to bid on it but held back. Then a couple of days later, I was looking at Remiington 8 and 81s and realized that they are breakdown rifles. That's kinda tempting, to be able to fit it inside a backpack and be discrete when transporting it. OTOH, they seem pretty heavy, and it sounds like expected accuracy is "minute of softball" at 100 yards. And, of course, a Marlin 336 would be the "reasonable" choice, and the most abundant, I guess.

Frankly, I'd probably put a red dot sight on it or maybe a low-power scope, spoiling the "vintage" flavor of these rifles, 'cause I'm getting old and squinty.

So, try to talk me in or out of these rifles and this caliber!

If I wanted to be sensible, an inexpensive bolt gun like a Ruger American in 6.5 CM, 7-08, or .270 Win would be the obvious choice, but...

Sorry this has little relevance to Ruger but now that they own Marlin, maybe a 336 in .35 Remmy will be back some day.
If you "want" a 35 Rem you should get one. I currently own about a dozen different rifles and a Contender in 35 Rem. Here where I hunt I hardly ever get a shot over 100 yds. so the 35 Rem. is more than adequate for my deer hunting. My favorite load is the Speer 180 Gr. FN. I have taken lots of deer a couple bear and a bunch of other varmints around the house with this load. I've used it in a Rem, 8 ,81, 141, 600, Marlin 336, Ruger #1 and many other rifles. Depending on your rifle your can get groups much under Minute-of-softball.

A lot of the older guns are not set up to mount a scope, I.E. Model 8, 81, 141 early 336, etc.

These are a couple groups shot with my No1 RSI at 100 yds. This rifle has a 1.25-4X Leupold scope on it.
 

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wwb

Hunter
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
2,796
Location
wisconsin
..........

I'm always a little skeptical about how much those would expand from my revolver loads, but I haven't had a chance to test it.
No experience with the .357 XTP, but some years back I loaded some .44 cal 240 grain XTP for use in a Ruger 96/44. It did the job, but the bullet was in pieces, and there was no exit wound. Went back to a Speer jacketed soft nose. Pretty sure it would perform properly out of a handgun.
 

40nascar

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 2, 2022
Messages
192
I own a pre-crossbolt safety marlin model 336. With my handloads using 200 gr. Corelockt bullets, I can get 3 shot groups under 2 inches at 100 yds.

I used that gun and load to get a 400+ Lb. Black Bear in Far Northern Ca. One shot, one kill ( approx 35 yds.) I had a 1.5x4 Variable Bushnell Dusk and Dawn scope on it. That made for a handy package, that was not too heavy.

As much as I like a model 8/81 or 14/141, I would hate to have to butcher one of those classics to get functional optics to work on them.
I'm old enough that I need glass optics. Even on a lever action. The Marlin is perfect for my application.

One other consideration: Ruger has stated that their Ruger/Marlins will not have the micro groove barrel. So I wouldn't be waiting around for one of those.

Best wishes on finding a 35 Remington that you like.
 

mikem2

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
115
Location
Northern Neck, VA
35 Rem is a boom flop Whitetail cartridge. 336 Marlin, best option IME, lightweight, durable, mechanicals are not complicated, and whitetail accuracy with factory Rem 200gr corelokts. A lot to like as an option.
 

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