32 H&R Magnum

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Danny

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 18, 2007
Messages
105
Location
NE Ohio
Has the 32 H&R Magnum ever been offered in a Blackhawk or just the Single Six?

Danny
 

GarrettJ

Bearcat
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Oct 8, 2016
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West MI
Alternately, there was an 8-shot Blackhawk chambered in .327 Fed.

Obviously one could run .32 H&R through that one as well.
 

Hondo44

Hawkeye
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
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People's Republik of California
There is a very inexpensive alternative Blackhawk.

Ruger's NM .30 Carbine Blackhawk will chamber and safely shoot .32 H&R Mag, the .327 Federal Mag and .32-20, because the cyl chambers do not enclose the case head (like the old model .30 M1 Blackhawk cyls).

You'll find the .32 H&R Mag and the .327 Federal Mag much more fun to shoot without the ear splitting report of the 30 carbine round. Performance of the .327 Fed Mag is closer to the 30 Carbine and with fine accuracy. The case neck of the 327 may be a little tight in some .30 M1 cylinder chambers (they do vary) and need a bit of honing. And the cases will expand only an extra .007" per side or so near the base. You may get a split case occasionally with much reloaded used brass near the middle of the case, but not usually. If you reload you don't have to full length resize and therefore not unnecessarily overwork the brass. Therefore not worth the cost of a custom cyl in .32/.327 for your .30 M1 Blackhawk.

The .312" bullets may tend to raise pressure negligibly in the smaller .308" barrel although of no consequence in the robust Ruger cyl and way under its max pressure limits. And you may have some leading with lead bullets that are too soft depending on hardness. But you'll have good accuracy.
 
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Hondo44

Hawkeye
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People's Republik of California
That's good to hear! I've heard that the old model cyls with full length chambers can have a headsapce bind on occasion. Oh I remember now, that was only with the .32 20 because it has a thicker rim than the .32/.327.
 

DutchV

Bearcat
Joined
Apr 8, 2022
Messages
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Location
21050
There is a very inexpensive alternative Blackhawk.

Ruger's NM .30 Carbine Blackhawk will chamber and safely shoot .32 H&R Mag, the .327 Federal Mag and .32-20, because the cyl chambers do not enclose the case head (like the old model .30 M1 Blackhawk cyls).

You'll find the .32 H&R Mag and the .327 Federal Mag much more fun to shoot without the ear splitting report of the 30 carbine round. Performance of the .327 Fed Mag is closer to the 30 Carbine and with fine accuracy. The case neck of the 327 may be a little tight in some .30 M1 cylinder chambers (they do vary) and need a bit of honing. And the cases will expand only an extra .007" per side or so near the base. You may get a split case occasionally with much reloaded used brass near the middle of the case, but not usually. If you reload you don't have to full length resize and therefore not unnecessarily overwork the brass. Therefore not worth the cost of a custom cyl in .32/.327 for your .30 M1 Blackhawk.

The .312" bullets may tend to raise pressure negligibly in the smaller .308" barrel although of no consequence in the robust Ruger cyl and way under its max pressure limits. And you may have some leading with lead bullets that are too soft depending on hardness. But you'll have good accuracy.

That's great to know. Those Blackhawks aren't hard to find, either.
 

Danny

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 18, 2007
Messages
105
Location
NE Ohio
There is a very inexpensive alternative Blackhawk.

Ruger's NM .30 Carbine Blackhawk will chamber and safely shoot .32 H&R Mag, the .327 Federal Mag and .32-20, because the cyl chambers do not enclose the case head (like the old model .30 M1 Blackhawk cyls).

You'll find the .32 H&R Mag and the .327 Federal Mag much more fun to shoot without the ear splitting report of the 30 carbine round. Performance of the .327 Fed Mag is closer to the 30 Carbine and with fine accuracy. The case neck of the 327 may be a little tight in some .30 M1 cylinder chambers (they do vary) and need a bit of honing. And the cases will expand only an extra .007" per side or so near the base. You may get a split case occasionally with much reloaded used brass near the middle of the case, but not usually. If you reload you don't have to full length resize and therefore not unnecessarily overwork the brass. Therefore not worth the cost of a custom cyl in .32/.327 for your .30 M1 Blackhawk.

The .312" bullets may tend to raise pressure negligibly in the smaller .308" barrel although of no consequence in the robust Ruger cyl and way under its max pressure limits. And you may have some leading with lead bullets that are too soft depending on hardness. But you'll have good accuracy.
Thanks for the hint. That may be the way to go, because of availability, cost, versatility, and that the .30 Carbine one has also been on my list.

Danny
 

Danny

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 18, 2007
Messages
105
Location
NE Ohio
It was also offered in a Vaquero convertible .32 H&R x 32-20. Not a Blackhawk, but still a large frame gun.

All of the above (Buckeye Blackhawk, .327 Blackhawk, and Vaquero) were low production runs and all command 4 figure prices for NIB condition these days.
Did the .327 not really catch on?

Danny
 

needsmostuff

Single-Sixer
Joined
Sep 4, 2008
Messages
345
Location
Tucson,AZ
Did the .327 not really catch on?

Danny
Well depends on how you look at it.
Supply has ALWAYS hampered it from day one.
At first it was hard to get proper guns for it. Plus, in my opinion, it was misunderstood and forced into a snubby guns for self-defense role.
It can do self-defense but that forced the 327 versus 38/357 debate that still rages.
It took Ruger and Lipsey's to see past that and make guns for it's true nature.

Catch on??? Well Ruger and Lipsey's rapidly sold out of EVERY model they made. All models have a loyal band of followers that would buy more if available. Most listed on Gunbroker sell at prices much higher than their original MSRP.
Supply is once again the limiting issue, but I would say, yeah, They caught on.
 

Springer2

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 6, 2022
Messages
22
Location
Florida
Well depends on how you look at it.
Supply has ALWAYS hampered it from day one.
At first it was hard to get proper guns for it. Plus, in my opinion, it was misunderstood and forced into a snubby guns for self-defense role.
It can do self-defense but that forced the 327 versus 38/357 debate that still rages.
It took Ruger and Lipsey's to see past that and make guns for it's true nature.

Catch on??? Well Ruger and Lipsey's rapidly sold out of EVERY model they made. All models have a loyal band of followers that would buy more if available. Most listed on Gunbroker sell at prices much higher than their original MSRP.
Supply is once again the limiting issue, but I would say, yeah, They caught on.
I agree. When the 327 came out, an ammo-gun shortage occurred soon after and the limited production focused on the established rounds, not the then new 327 magnum. The other issue was limited bullet selection, mostly between 85 and 100 grains. Having played with them now for years I learned that if you want to get the most out of it, you have to cast your own bullets. The 100 grain has a sectional density (SD) of 0.146 and compares to a 357 125 gn at 0.140 SD. The bullets that perform well for me are 116, 120, and 132 grains; 0.170, 0.176, and 0.194 SD respectively. For comparison a 357 mag 158 has a SD of 0.177. I really like the 327 magnum but it works best for a handloader.
 

Danny

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 18, 2007
Messages
105
Location
NE Ohio
I agree. When the 327 came out, an ammo-gun shortage occurred soon after and the limited production focused on the established rounds, not the then new 327 magnum. The other issue was limited bullet selection, mostly between 85 and 100 grains. Having played with them now for years I learned that if you want to get the most out of it, you have to cast your own bullets. The 100 grain has a sectional density (SD) of 0.146 and compares to a 357 125 gn at 0.140 SD. The bullets that perform well for me are 116, 120, and 132 grains; 0.170, 0.176, and 0.194 SD respectively. For comparison a 357 mag 158 has a SD of 0.177. I really like the 327 magnum but it works best for a handloader.
Thanks. This includes needsmostuff. Personally, I see the 327 and 32 H&R Magnum as a small game revolver round, but that is maybe just me.

Danny
 

Boxhead

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 28, 2004
Messages
890
Location
Either Texas or Idaho
S&W did a dandy version.

uhriP5v.jpg
 

needsmostuff

Single-Sixer
Joined
Sep 4, 2008
Messages
345
Location
Tucson,AZ
S&W did a dandy version.

It's true, they made a couple of interesting versions . But they just stuck their toe in the water then quit.
There is just not enough of them around to feed the hungry masses.
Your lack of turn line reflects the biggest problem with S&W 32 mags, you can't afford to shoot them anymore .
My 4" SP-101 checks the same boxes and I can beat the pee-wadding out of it and not offend any collectors.
In the same boat these never see daylight as it would be silly to shoot them.

Models 032 and 632
MVC-858F.jpg


Model 632-1
MVC-863F.jpg



On the flip side of the coin these Charter Arms 32H&Rs can be packed around and beat to death,,,,,,,,,,,, and nobody cares.

MVC-846F.jpg
 
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