10 mm magnum revolver easy to make or not .

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Onty

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Sorry for the long delay on what is close to a zombie thread but I just saw your response.
I was afraid someone will try this and ruin some equipment.
Don't care where you read it that does not work . Good press bad press carbide die super lube whatever , won't work.
The cartridge will size nicely till you hit the rib . Dead stop. That is solid brass and will not compress ,not even little .
If you pull it out there it looks like a belted mag rifle case.
If you try to force it thru I can guarantee it will get stuck hard enough to rip the rim off trying to extract it.
In my case it actually pulled out the carbide ring also!

Back to the part about looking like a belted case. That's where the lathe comes in , turning that belt off.
I have danced this dance and that is simply the facts.
If you believe you have seen Taffin write something different I would like to see a reference because fellas are gonna lose dies trying.
Yes, you are right. However, please notice I said "Strong press". FYI, there are some strong presses capable of swagging bullets. Small hydraulic press could be also used, or vise for milling machines, to eliminate "belt". I had done (tool) for swagging, thinning, case rim, from .060 to .038, creating .455 Webley Mk I cases from 45 Cowboy Special, or (shortened) 45 Schofield.
 
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needsmostuff

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Yes, you are right. However, please notice I said "Strong press". FYI, there are some strong presses capable of swagging bullets. Small hydraulic press could be also used, or wise for milling machines, to eliminate "belt". .
Hydraulic presses and milling machines????? Thought we were talking about reloading for the average person not using machines capable of making car bumpers.
You bet , a hydraulic press can do most anything and probably get a 41 mag case into a 40 die all the way. But how you gonna get it out? I forced mine in maybe1/32 of an inch and ripped the rim off and pulled out the carbide ring attempting to remove .
You need to try this yourself before telling folks how easy it is to do because it just won't work at the average reloading bench.
OR,,,,,,
As I mentioned in the beginning of this thread , you can simply shorten a 30-30 case and go shooting.
 

Onty

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Hydraulic presses and milling machines????? Thought we were talking about reloading for the average person not using machines capable of making car bumpers.
You bet , a hydraulic press can do most anything and probably get a 41 mag case into a 40 die all the way. But how you gonna get it out? I forced mine in maybe1/32 of an inch and ripped the rim off and pulled out the carbide ring attempting to remove .
You need to try this yourself before telling folks how easy it is to do because it just won't work at the average reloading bench.
OR,,,,,,
As I mentioned in the beginning of this thread , you can simply shorten a 30-30 case and go shooting.
I don't have intention of being arrogant, but let face the facts; If somebody wants to go with unusual or obsolete cartridge, he or she better be ready and equipped to make some custom made tooling, or have a skilled friend that have access to a nice machine shop. When I was a kid, we had Rast und Gasser M1898 revolver, 8 mm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rast_&_Gasser_M1898 . Of course, no ammo or cases, but we had 7,62 Tokarev cases, plain vise (no machine one), some drill bits, hand crank drill, and lot of will and persistence to make old Gasser shooting again. A friend made in machine shop swagging die, we kids found one M6 longer bolt. After swagging was done, M6 bolt was inserted into case, one wack with hammer, and case was punched from swagging die. Yes, it had even rim! After swagging, we drilled counter-bored hole for 209 shotgun primer. And we had 8 mm Gasser cases. They were bit shorter than required, but that wasn't problem.

After case was formed, we had 209 shotgun primers, shotgun powder and 8 mm buckshot I was stealing from my father (still have a blue plastic container were he kept primers), and our 8 mm cartridge was loaded. I am saying "we", but in reality, all noted above was my idea, and about 75% of the work.

So, on the end, if someone isn't ready to go through all that hassle with (at this moment) weird or obsolete cartridges, like 10 mm rimmed, I suggest to stick with standard calibers. Being somewhat lazy in my late sixties, I go with standard rounds now. But, if some kind of 10 mm rimmed revolver comes up, I will put on side couple hundred 41 Magnum cases, and modify them. Yeah, 30-30 brass could be used, but for me is bit more work than using 41 Magnum brass.
 
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Onty

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To be clear, @Onty is talking about a machine VISE, not a actual machine tool. I'd bet many around here have a vise that could handle this task.
First, thanks for pointing to my error spelling error. As you properly specified, we are talking just about vise. Of course, strong ordinary vise will do it. I prefer those for milling machine because they have nice flat surfaces on the bottom of opening, all surfaces are parallel and square, and they are STRONG. These days there are plenty of good used ones, cheaper (and far better) than new ordinary vises. On top of that, you folks in USA have so many companies supplying all kinds of tools and metals in all shapes, at quite affordable prices.
 

needsmostuff

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Well gentleman, I'm walking away from this discussion as I have said my piece and no need to repeat. And it was all a thread drift anyway from the original question.
I have no way to make a special die and no access to a hydraulic press. Only a Rockchucker and standard dies ,,,,,, like 99% of the reloaders out there.
I do have a couple of 6" vices and if I ever chance into a disposable 40 sizing die I will try it .
Till then 30-30 is simple (a little over 1 hour to make 50) to shorten and will do just fine.
 
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loaded round

Hunter
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Wouldn't it be cheaper in the long run just to sell your Dan Wesson revolver and purchase a S&W Model 610 in 10 MM? That Smith is a fine pistol and I've owned one for several years now and it's a great shooter. I've owned mine for over a year and it's a great shooter. Bonus is you can also shoot cheaper 40 S&W ammo in it since you still have to use those moon clips.
 

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