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PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2014 4:10 am 
Hawkeye

Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2005 1:01 am
Posts: 18616
Location: Milo Maine
Not an expert by any stretch of the imagination, that said I would never consider
welding on any of my guns. ps

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2014 3:17 pm 
Bearcat

Joined: Sat Nov 22, 2014 6:12 pm
Posts: 29
I would try to machine the hump for the rear sight level and then cut a proper size dovetail for the sight. I am not sure who makes the sight for the Match Champion but I am sure Brownells has what you want. I have not tried it on a revolver but it worked on a Springfield semi auto at both ends.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2014 4:26 pm 
Newly Registered

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2014 4:10 pm
Posts: 19
Hondo44 wrote:
JD,
Very good info. When I Tig weld, I allow cooling between laying beads. I have more trouble preventing pits that I find when I dress down the welding and have to go back and fill with more welding. One thing that has helped is to soak the part in acetone and get every last trace of oil out of the pores and off the rod.


There's a couple reasons why your getting porosity in your weld.

1st don't use any grinding wheels or wire brush used on other metals, make sure the metal is free from grease and oil
2nd make sure your using the right rod for the material your welding.
3rd don't contaminate your tungsten. This is the most common reason for porosity.

Hope this helps.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2014 4:43 pm 
Hunter

Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2001 2:01 am
Posts: 3275
Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Simple answer to the OP: Yes, it can be done. No, you don't want to have it done to your gun.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:44 am 
Single-Sixer

Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2012 9:06 am
Posts: 227
Location: Ball Ground, Georgia
Yep, If you find someone who actually does it for a "Living"...:)
Knowing whats critical and what is not, like most things in life, Common Sense and Experience goes along way, well and having the Right Equipment...37yrs and counting.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 10:54 am 
Hunter

Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 9:11 pm
Posts: 3263
Location: Ridgefield WA
WOW!! That welding is 'beyond imagine' fantastic. A real pro!


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 4:02 pm 
Blackhawk

Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 11:32 am
Posts: 989
Correction on "no heat treatment" on Ruger frames. Ruger cylinder frames are heat treated before machining. This includes Single-Six models. Once upon a time Ruger heat treated after machining. At some point a change was made to avoid warpage, and treatment preceded milling. Heat treatment differs between chrome-moly and stainless, and is specific to alloy.
David Bradshaw


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2014 1:22 am 
Hunter

Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2004 2:01 am
Posts: 3411
Location: Either Texas or Idaho
22/45 Fan wrote:
Simple answer to the OP: Yes, it can be done. No, you don't want to have it done to your gun.


Rubbish. Alan Harton and many others I am sure can weld stainless with relative ease and all is perfectly safe too. Though not stainless Alan filled in the topstrap, where the original rear sight sat, on the 44 Special of mine and I still have all ten fingers.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2014 12:11 pm 
Hunter

Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2003 2:01 am
Posts: 2602
Nice, but the question was about stainless, which offers distinctly different challenges from carbon steel.

For the most part, the answer remains that stainless CAN be welded, but it's risky if you don't know what you're doing, few gunsmiths are willing to do it, few CAN do it right.

Your average corner gun mechanic won't even try.
Denis


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