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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 6:18 pm 
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Single-Sixer

Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 3:02 pm
Posts: 282
Location: New Mexico
I've had the hots for a BH in .357/9mm with 6.5" barrel for some time. I'm holding out as long as I can but I am only human.

Shopping on GunsAmerica etc I find them NIB for less than $500. Older models seem to go for quite a bit more than that.

I am looking for a shooter. Is there any functional reason to prefer an older model?

Thanks

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 8:00 pm 
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Well,, most of us who enjoy shooting them, the OM's are definately sweeter feeling in the hands. The "functioning" of them just feels a lot better. No extra safety transfer parts to change the feel. Of course,, we all know to keep an empty chamber under the hammer. So my thoughts are that the OM's function smoother & easier than the NM's.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 9:05 pm 
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Blackhawk

Joined: Wed Oct 27, 2004 1:01 am
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Location: Southwest VA USA
The Old Model .357/9mm revolvers are built on the medium frame, like the the new Flat Top models.

The New Model .357 Blackhawk revolvers that came out in 1973 were built on the same frame as the .44 Magnum revolvers. Way too heavy for me.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 11:54 pm 
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Hawkeye

Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 1:01 am
Posts: 6931
Location: Cut 'N Shoot, Texas
The size of the OM-357 is much more suited to it's cartridge, which makes it a smaller, lighter, quicker, better balanced gun than the NM because the NM is built on the heavier, bulkier 44-Magnum frame which required it to also have a heavier/bulkier cylinder.
The OM is also easier to load, usualy has a smoother action, and is timed better. "Timed better" meaning that unlike the NM, it don't scar-up it's cylinder unless the action is abused in some manner.

On the other hand; A NM can be safely carried fully loaded while an unaltered OM should be carried with an empty chamber under the hammer.

Actualy, when ya get right down to it.....other than they share the same hammer spring, grip panels and rear sight, they are two totaly different guns.

DGW


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 9:53 am 
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Buckeye

Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 4:45 pm
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Location: MISSISSIPPI
I am different than most people because I prefer the new models. I went through a phase years ago when I had a bunch of the old model rugers. I liked them ok but prefered the new models without all the clicking and that you could carry safely fully loaded. Today personally I would pass up a old model and pick a new model for my personal use.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 1:25 pm 
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Single-Sixer

Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 3:02 pm
Posts: 282
Location: New Mexico
Wow! This is a much bigger difference than I had imagined.

I'm going to have to put some thought into this.

I like big and heavy. Weight seems to bother me less than most people and it would be nice for the .357 rounds.

The quality of the action, well the trigger, is of first importance to me and likewise cylinder timing. I had intended to put some money into the gun and have a gunsmith refine it.

I much prefer wooden grips over plastic or rubber.

I don't understand the relationship between cylinder timing and 'scarring'. I assume this means the depth of the turn line?

Thanks for all your advice.

Added later. Dammit! I'm going to end up with one of each. I can see it coming.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 1:34 am 
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Blackhawk

Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 2:01 am
Posts: 785
Location: Tucson, AZ, USA
You want newer - particularly post-2007. This can be IDed by the "lawyer's warning label" on the barrel - if it's side-barrel it's older, under-barrel is newer. (No warning at all means MUCH older.)

The difference with the underbarrel-warning guns is, the cylinders are built with a new method. Each chamber is done one at a time with the same bit/reamer set. This ensures uniform chambers, and the new process also seems to be putting out better chambers overall. Average accuracy went up when Ruger went this way.

Again: the above applies to the LARGE frame single actions. The mid-frames from 2004 forward (New Vaquero, 357 Blackhawk Flattop, Montados and all the 44Spls) have the new cylinder process no matter where the barrel warning is.

Also, the very first large-frame to get the new-type cylinders was the 50th Anniversary 44Mag Flattop - the only large-frame recent "flat top" and the only large-frame with the new cylinder and a side-barrel warning.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 8:42 am 
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Hawkeye
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Location: Casa Grande, Arizona
meshugunner wrote:
I don't understand the relationship between cylinder timing and 'scarring'. I assume this means the depth of the turn line?

Thanks for all your advice.

Added later. Dammit! I'm going to end up with one of each. I can see it coming.


I think the 'timing' referred to in an earlier post has to do with the points in the cocking sequence in which the cylinder latch lifts & re-contacts the cylinder. Old Model action holds the cylinder latch off the cylinder until the third 'click'. (It IS the 3rd click actually!) By that time the latch is nearly lined up with the latch groove in the cylinder. It's possible to rotate the cylinder ahead slightly by hand to disallow the latch from contacting the cylinder until lined up with the latch groove.

With New Models however, the 1st 'click' places the cylinder latch back on the cylinder surface much earlier in the sequence which causes the infamous radial 'drag line' on the cylinder.

As far as functionality goes... New Model action can certainly be cleaned up to operate very smoothly, but many folks still prefer old models for the relative simplicity & 'crisp' action. Personally, I have both NM & OM 'shooters' and enjoy them all!

You're probably correct though... Sure as can be you'll end up with one each! :)

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 5:33 pm 
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Single-Sixer

Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2011 7:43 am
Posts: 284
Location: arkansas
My view is a little different from the "old hands". I had old model for a while and never could warm up to it. Recently I sold it and still later obtained a like new .357/9mm.(2007). It is more accurate than any pistol I have ever owned. And as a plus the 9mm is accurate also at real world self-defense range. The larger size frame is a non issue for me.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 5:35 pm 
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Single-Sixer

Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2011 7:43 am
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Location: arkansas
My view is a little different from the "old hands". I had old model for a while and never could warm up to it. Recently I sold it and still later obtained a like new .357/9mm.(2007). It is more accurate than any pistol I have ever owned. And as a plus the 9mm is accurate also at real world self-defense range. The larger size frame is a non issue for me.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 9:51 pm 
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Single-Sixer

Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 3:02 pm
Posts: 282
Location: New Mexico
Well it's settled. At least for the time being. I sent an LCR .22lr into to Ruger to lighten the trigger which they wouldn't do. They offered me a trade for a different gun and I chose a BlackHawk .357/9mm 6.5" barrel, blued.

Thank you all for your advice and comments

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 10:52 pm 
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Hawkeye

Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2009 7:34 am
Posts: 5932
Here's a suggestion:

Consider sending your NM Blackhawk to Long Hunter in Amarillo for an "action job."

Their mods improve the action substantially. They're well known in the cowboy-action world.

http://www.longhunt.com/gunsmithing/ruger.htm

Good luck -

Monty


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2012 12:18 am 
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Single-Sixer

Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 3:02 pm
Posts: 282
Location: New Mexico
Montelores wrote:
Here's a suggestion:

Consider sending your NM Blackhawk to Long Hunter in Amarillo for an "action job."

Their mods improve the action substantially. They're well known in the cowboy-action world.

http://www.longhunt.com/gunsmithing/ruger.htm

Good luck -

Monty


I was looking for just such a service. Thank you, I will.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 10:48 pm 
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Single-Sixer

Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 3:02 pm
Posts: 282
Location: New Mexico
Update: Ruger was a long time sending out my BlackHawk. They had a factory shutdown right after I sent it in and then of course there was a back log of orders. Then my FFL was on travel. No matter. I was in no great hurry. Plus they gave me this gun as an even exchange for an LCR22 that I sent in.

So it's a brand new .357/9mm convertible 6.5" barrel.[url = http://www.ruger.com/products/newModelB ... /0318.html]BlackHawk Specs[/url]

I have taken it down to the range twice and it's a sweet gun to shoot. I haven't shot magnums in it yet just .38Sp+p & 9mm. It is very comfortable to shoot and I very quickly got to the group size I am used to with those calibers. The 9mm cylinder seemed to produce slightly tighter groups. Really a great gun. It was cool to have both cylinders, the first time I took it out I was low on .38 ammo so I just switched to 9mm when the .38 ran out.

It goes out to Long Hunter for action work next week together with my 9.5" barrel Single Six convertible. They didn't add any extra charge for the second cylinder. It's a 3-4 week turnaround at their shop so more patience.

When it comes back I want to put a thinner front sight blade on it and the SS. Any suggestions on how to do this? FO would work but it doesn't seem right on this gun.

Thanks.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2012 5:24 am 
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Blackhawk

Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 11:32 am
Posts: 566
meshugunner... Before you narrow the .125" (1/8") front sight on your new .357/9mm Convertible, consider what you want for a rear notch. Your present notch may be .125" wide, or .142"----very wide. To narrow the front sight without putting an equally narrow notch on the rear will make it hard to hold elevation, which requires seeing top edge of front and rear sights in exactly the same plane. Windage also will become more difficult, particularly in bright sun.

Hamilton Bowen makes a rear sight with narrow blade. Get the click-adjustable model.

Young strong eyes index narrow sights well. Older eyes want a wider plane on the front sight to level the sights. And where does your eye belong at the moment of squeeze? Right on the top edge of the front sight.

Dependent on how far from your eye the front sight is (eye relief), an 1/8-inch front blade appears to be 12" wide at 100 yards, 24" wide at 200 yds.

If you narrow the front sight, do not make it less than .100-inch. Otherwise, you will have a hard time holding elevation.

Your New Model Blackhawk with transfer bar system is an excellent choice. Rugers may be dry fired forever without damage. No gun takes dry fire better than a Ruger. Oil or grease the action, cylinder pin, and sight screws.
David Bradshaw


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