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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 1:07 pm 
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It might actually be "drain" pipe...picked it up at lowes. 8 feet was $4


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PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2009 9:02 am 
Single-Sixer

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 7:38 pm
Posts: 240
I've been wanting to try the rust blue for awhile. I ordered some from Midway or Brownell's a few years ago and just haven't gotten around to it yet. Looks fun!! Thanks for the photos and the write up.

Joe


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PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2009 10:10 am 
Site Admin

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Aeroscout9 wrote:
I've been wanting to try the rust blue for awhile. I ordered some from Midway or Brownell's a few years ago and just haven't gotten around to it yet. Looks fun!! Thanks for the photos and the write up.

Joe


Since this writeup I have done 2 more guns and a Home made knife....This is they way to go for sure if you are a "do-it-yourself" type of person.

I highly suggest the Laurel Mountain formula as it has a detergent that cuts oil from fingers...very difficult snafu when typically doing this.


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PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2009 1:10 pm 
Hawkeye
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Location: Terrebonne, Oregon, USA
Very interesting. I have always had the water boiling in an iron tank so that the parts will immediately self dry. I can see that the hair dryer accomplishes the same thing with much less trouble and less water boil-off.

I will give your technique a try on my current Single Six project.

SAJohn


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PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2009 3:03 pm 
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SAJohn wrote:
Very interesting. I have always had the water boiling in an iron tank so that the parts will immediately self dry. I can see that the hair dryer accomplishes the same thing with much less trouble and less water boil-off.

I will give your technique a try on my current Single Six project.

SAJohn



Actually I have found that the parts only need to be in the boiling water bath for 5 minutes or so to convert the Iron Oxide/hematite (Fe2O3) to Magnetite (Fe3O4). By just pouring the boiling water into the tank...you can take them out in time to still be hot enough to dry almost immediately. Hit them with the wet low thread count cloth or 0000 steel wool, rub down with acetone, then re-coat with the solution. The hair dryer is what I used in the first pass simply because I was overly cautious about doing it "right"

The only thing that really slows this process down with rifles is plugging the barrels to avoid pitting the chamber. Much easier when doing a revolver or knife.


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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2009 6:34 am 
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This topic would make a good "sticky" here.

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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2009 8:28 am 
Site Admin

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contender wrote:
This topic would make a good "sticky" here.

Agreed


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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2009 9:55 am 
Hawkeye

Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2007 3:17 pm
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Location: Kentucky
Great thread, Matt.

What's photo #3 from your collection . . . the one with the "plastic wrap" over the barrel?


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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2009 10:33 am 
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I have read where if it is a "dry" day that you can make a humidity box that speeds the rusting process. I decided to try it out during one of the cycles to see if it made a difference. I got a pail of hot water and put it to one side of the hanger assembly and covered the whole thing with a tarp.

It didn't really make a difference on a 50% humidity day...and even read where this can actually set you back if there is any condensation that forms on the item you are bluing.

Picture in question:
Image


To follow up on your earlier question on why this is preferred on old double barreled shotguns...I did some research.

It is less because of the temperature differential between processes as much as the use of caustic salts. The caustic salt process is at about 300F where the rusting process is 212F. the solder does contains air bubbles that contain moisture that can expand and cause deformation...minor concern, but worth mentioning. The major reason from what I can tell, however, is that it is really difficult to remove all of the caustic salts from between the barrels...too many voids and you get salt creep as a result.


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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2009 10:43 am 
Hawkeye

Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2007 3:17 pm
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Location: Kentucky
Thanks, Matt.

FWIW, I went to the Laurel Mountain site and read their descriptions and instructions. It's of note that the solution used is, in fact, called "browning" solution. The addition of the boiling water steps described here produce the blue/black coloration, but if used without the boiling water steps will produce that old, antique "rust brown" color.

http://www.laurelmountainforge.com/barr ... n_inst.htm

I was not aware of this.

:D


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2009 8:15 am 
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Update....I have now completed 8 reblues with this method. Most were single shot .22 rifles with a simple action, but the results are easy to reproduce and look as good (if not better) than any hot salt reblue I have seen.

The smaller parts such as trigger guards, screws, bolts and so on were hot salt blued by me and match up perfectly to the rust blue process as well...since you are doing the same thing (abeit different methods) it is the composition of the metal rather than the process that determines the color of the final product.

One thing that I have found....somewhat of a warning

I have noticed that the more you polish in preparation for this...the more difficulty and time the process takes. Not because of the time spent polishing, but the resistance of the polished surface to the nitric acid in the formula. It doesn't take well and it ends up producing the same as if you didn't polish. This means that if you are looking for a satin blue you are golden. If you are trying to reproduce the blue found on a S&W or an old SRH...you will not be able to do it with this method. Had a couple of old $150 S&W model 10s that I redid and they took much longer to refinish simply because I did not rough up the finish rather than try to keep the polish intact.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2009 8:57 am 
Bearcat

Joined: Fri May 01, 2009 6:46 am
Posts: 18
Location: South Carolina
That is interesting and good to know. It is like applying a finish to wood. The best oil finishes/stains are applied to wood sanded with no more than 180-220 grit. Any higher grit can burnish the surface so the finish can't soak in. Same principle must be happening here.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2009 10:58 am 
Blackhawk

Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2006 1:01 am
Posts: 715
Location: Altamont, Illinois, USA
Laurel Mountain is very good for browning. I have done three muzzleloaders with it and wouldn't use anything else. Humidity is most important as it will not brown on a dry day without a damp box. Have not tried it for bluing yet. I-Like-Pie have you tried it on any blackhawks yet? If so what were your result?

Ed


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:24 am 
Hunter
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Location: State College, PA, USA
This months volume (March 2010) of the American Gunsmithing Assoc. magazine has a good article and description on making a rust bluing cabinet and the steps involved in cold "fume" bluing.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:28 am 
Bearcat

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 11:28 am
Posts: 42
Location: Michigan
Hey here's a plus one for the instructions provided herein! I just finished an old Marlin with rust blue (Brownells formula) 7 coats and the piece looks better than when it left the factory.

Thanks for the good advice all.

One bad thing...now the kids think that immersion in boiling water will convert any iron oxide.


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