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PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 9:41 pm 
Site Admin

Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 1:01 am
Posts: 5515
Location: Chattanooga, TN
I use vinegar and have a bottle beside my bluing setup at all times.

I haven't had to do it yet, but I imagine I could do a full Chippendale strip and bath in vinegar in a matter of seconds if I had 300 degree bluing salts soaking though my clothing.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 2:09 pm 
Bearcat

Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2007 1:01 am
Posts: 52
Location: KY
Years later, a note to the safety police or others that feel like this is above their head, Don't try this! Also, I'm not suggesting anyone try this. For me, several decades ago, I worked for a well known individual that "builds" 1911 race guns, in other words, customizes them along with just about every other hand and long gun you can imagine. One of the things I always wanted to know was how to hot blue guns and thus, I learned well and is why I posted this because I knew others in the gun world might want to know also. This is not a difficult process. It requires patience particularly in the prep/polishing area and more importantly, Common Sense.

A few notes,

* again, ALWAYS WEAR FULL EYE PROTECTION, Chemical resistant gloves, and protective clothing! I cannot emphasize the eye protection enough. One small drop of this stuff will result in permanent eye damage and vision loss. Anytime you are around bluing salts, use a full face shield or goggles, not your shooting glasses.

* When you first mix the chemicals, regardless if you use this recipe or the salts from Brownells, etc, there will be a VERY Strong ammonia smell And as I originally stated, mix the chemicals outside. The initial strong ammonia smell will go away and that will be the end of it. As some have stated, ammonia fumes, while not pleasant, are not going to kill you unless you subject yourself to the punishment required to succumb to them.

* Does this work as well as brand X bluing salts? Yes, it works better than any of the brands that I've tried. It's more durable and mimics the same beautiful finish found on pre-war weapons. As a poster pointed out, this recipe was found in older gunsmithing manuals. At one time folks didn't just pick up the phone and order crap, they made it.

* Will this dull high polished steel? No, the more you polish, the higher the shine will be on the completed piece. If you correctly polish the metal out to 1000 grit, your finish will trump what used to be found on Colt Pythons.

* What about parts that come out brown? Make sure you use distilled water. Expect the parts to come out with some brown tint to them, you just oxidized them. After removing from the bluing salts, rinse and then scrub them with dawn and XXXX steel wool to remove the brown and you will have a black/blue finish.

* My part didn't come out dark enough. Scrub the piece with dawn and xxxx, rinse completely, wipe dry and place back in heated bluing salts for an additional 20 minutes. Repeat as necessary.

* So and so who happens to be a nuclear scientist and studies moon rocks says blah, blah, blah. Proof is in the pudding. Using this recipe or any other bluing salts can and will result in burns and loss of eyesight if proper care is not taken. ALWAYS USE PROPER EYE PROTECTION! As one poster stated, the danger equivalent is that of deep frying a turkey. If this is over your head, DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS!


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 11:09 am 
Single-Sixer

Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2014 7:55 am
Posts: 226
I have been using this process for a few years, I learned much the same way. I use Sodium Nitrate rather than Ammonium Nitrate, Sodium Nitrate is easier to come by.

I did a write up on my blog here: http://tincanbandit.blogspot.com/2013/0 ... shing.html

I have dozens of pictures of guns that I have restored. It helps to grow my collection when you can buy two or three rusty guns for the price of one nice one and then restore them yourself


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 8:31 pm 
Bearcat

Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 7:24 pm
Posts: 31
Good to know this process but it sounds like obtaining the chemicals could be difficult after West Texas was blown up by ammonium nitrate. I have had good results with Hoppe's #9 Cold Blue Kit after I learned to not follow their directions. The gun in question is a Remington Model 34 Bolt Action 22 cal. Rifle (Circa 1932-35). My first attempt I followed their instructions but disregarded their statement about small areas only. I mean if it works on a small area, why not a full length barrel ? I sanded the metal and used the cleaner that came with the kit. I then applied the blue liquid with the applicator and after three minutes I rinsed it in water and wiped dry. The results were not satisfactory as the finish was not blue but more of a bronze color. Better than before but not blue. A year or so after the first attempt I took the ammo tube off the gun and sanded back to bare metal with progressive grit down to 800 grit. Used their cleaner several times and applied the liquid blue to the tube and continued putting it on for about 15 minutes. When a spot dried I would re-wet it with the liquid. Instead of washing off with water, I wiped it down with RemOil. The results were good, I had a dark blue finish and then did the rest of the gun. With the stock also refinished the gun looks like new.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 9:59 pm 
Bearcat

Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 7:24 pm
Posts: 31
Reply to Meshugunner : I did not read all the posts before making my post so I missed your comments about Ammonia. It appears that you are confused about the chemicals used in this process. It is not household Ammonia used in this process, but ammonia nitrate. Yes there are Ammonia fumes that come from the chemical reaction, but liquid Ammonia is not used. While your intention might well be to throw in a unrelated comment about using household Ammonia for cleaning, it could cause confusion to some.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2015 8:09 am 
Single-Sixer

Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2014 7:55 am
Posts: 226
thomaskling wrote:
Reply to Meshugunner : I did not read all the posts before making my post so I missed your comments about Ammonia. It appears that you are confused about the chemicals used in this process. It is not household Ammonia used in this process, but ammonia nitrate. Yes there are Ammonia fumes that come from the chemical reaction, but liquid Ammonia is not used. While your intention might well be to throw in a unrelated comment about using household Ammonia for cleaning, it could cause confusion to some.



You need a nitrate for this and Ammonium Nitrate is the hardest to get as it is a great oxidizer for AMFO bombs. You can also use Potassium or Sodium Nitrate

Potassium Nitrate (also known as Saltpeter) is a main ingredient in black powder as well as a stump remover and other food & industrial uses

Sodium Nitrate is a fertilizer that is also used in food production (hot dogs and sausages) and other industrial processes, it is by far the easiest to get. I get mine from a Pottery Supply house.

For those overly concerned about safety, this is no different that pumping your own gas, grilling a steak or boiling water....all of these things CAN be dangerous, buy if you use common sense, wear your PPE and are vigilant about safety...all will be fine


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