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PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2019 1:18 pm 
Hawkeye

Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 1:01 am
Posts: 9715
Location: Memphis, TN USA
ilikerams wrote:
Bob Wright wrote:
Many years ago I was acquainted with Miss Ruth Ford, who was a missionary to China prior to World War II. She was a nurse, and later was captured and interred by the Japanese. As a nurse, the Japanese allowed her to continue her duties and had pretty much her freedom so long as she stayed within her compound.

She to us this story once, this sometime in the early 'Fifties.

She often flew on Air Force C-46s over the "Hump" after being liberated from the Japanese arrest. And often they ferried Chinese coolies to bases as workers. And all too often they landed with fewer workers than they left with. They posted a crew member to see what was going on.

It seems the coolies would get some kind of game going during the flight. They got very serious as they played, then a shout would go up, and the loser would be tossed out the open cargo door!

Problem solved!



Bob Wright

That's quite a penalty for losing a game, so what did the winner get? :shock:


If the flight lasted long enough, he got to play another game!

Bob Wright


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2019 1:36 pm 
Single-Sixer

Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 1:01 am
Posts: 300
Location: Dallas Ga
My uncle went down in a C46 flying into Harrisburg Pa in 1957...bad weather was the cause....he left a daughter 3 weeks old...


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2019 7:42 pm 
Hunter
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Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2007 2:01 am
Posts: 2505
Location: Idaho
ilikerams wrote:
Bob Wright wrote:
Many years ago I was acquainted with Miss Ruth Ford, who was a missionary to China prior to World War II. She was a nurse, and later was captured and interred by the Japanese. As a nurse, the Japanese allowed her to continue her duties and had pretty much her freedom so long as she stayed within her compound.

She to us this story once, this sometime in the early 'Fifties.

She often flew on Air Force C-46s over the "Hump" after being liberated from the Japanese arrest. And often they ferried Chinese coolies to bases as workers. And all too often they landed with fewer workers than they left with. They posted a crew member to see what was going on.

It seems the coolies would get some kind of game going during the flight. They got very serious as they played, then a shout would go up, and the loser would be tossed out the open cargo door!

Problem solved!



Bob Wright

That's quite a penalty for losing a game, so what did the winner get? :shock:

a parachute

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2019 10:14 pm 
Hawkeye

Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 12:04 am
Posts: 8922
Location: Medford, OR
Seems it would be difficult to defenestrate a person from a pressurized aircraft at altitude. The sudden de-pressurization certainly would be noticed by all in the aircraft as their ears would pop painfully and the air would get thin.

The C46 was a pressurized aircraft that's why it was used to fly over the Himalayas, superchargers and pressurization made it possible.

Wien Airlines were still flying them from Fairbanks to Kotzebue hauling freight in the early 70s.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:15 am 
Hawkeye
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Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 9303
Location: Richmond Texas USA
Paul,
The Military C-46 was not pressurized. They were designed to be but was delegated by the Military. The one I flew on was not.
The C-46 was both a Good and Bad plane :wink:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curtiss_C-46_Commando

None of the C-46s purchased by the U.S. military were pressurized and the first 30 delivered to the AAF were sent back to the factory for 53 immediate modifications.
Service ceiling: 24,500 ft

After a series of mechanical problems were controlled if not surmounted, the C-46 proved its worth in the airlift operation in spite of continuing maintenance headaches. It could carry more cargo higher than other Allied twin-engine transport aircraft in the theater, including light artillery, fuel, ammunition, parts of aircraft and, on occasion, livestock. Its powerful engines enabled it to climb satisfactorily with heavy loads, staying aloft on one engine if not overloaded, though "war emergency" load limits of up to 40,000 lbs often erased any safety margins. Nevertheless, after the troublesome Curtiss-Electric electrically controlled pitch mechanism on the propellers had been removed, the C-46 continued to be employed in the CBI and over wide areas of southern China throughout the war years.[15] Even so, the C-46 was referred to by ATC pilots as the "flying coffin" with at least 31 known instances of fires or explosions in flight between May 1943 and March 1945, and many others missing and never found.[14] Other names used by the men who flew them were "The Whale," the "Curtiss Calamity," [13] and the "plumber's nightmare". The C-46's huge cargo volume (twice that of the C-47), three times the weight, large cargo doors, powerful engines and long range also made it suitable for the vast distances of the Pacific island campaign. In particular, the U.S. Marines found the aircraft (known as the R5C) useful in their amphibious Pacific operations, flying supplies in and wounded personnel out of numerous and hastily built island landing strips.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2019 10:59 pm 
Hawkeye

Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 12:04 am
Posts: 8922
Location: Medford, OR
Thanks for the correction. I don't know where I got the idea they were. I think I read somewhere that they were used for the high altitude cargo hauls to China and were both supercharged and pressurized. I think I read about some early development versions that were pressurized.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:00 pm 
Hawkeye

Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 12:04 am
Posts: 8922
Location: Medford, OR
Thanks for the correction. I don't know where I got the idea they were. I think I read about some early development versions that were pressurized.

Now I have even more admiration for those guys who flew the Hump.

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...extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! ...moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue! (Barry Goldwater)

Paul W.
Sad NRA Life Member


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 9:32 am 
Hawkeye
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Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 9303
Location: Richmond Texas USA
Paul,
You are correct in that the C-46 was to be pressurized for civilian flight.
I found this video to be VERY interesting. It shows why we were in the CBI area and the building of the IMPOSSIBLE ROAD "The Ledo Road" and then a pipeline. Unbelievable conditions that were endured.
https://video.search.yahoo.com/search/v ... ction=view


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